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Vomiting

General characteristics

General characteristics

Vomiting (also known as emesis) is the voluntary or involuntary expulsion of the contents of the stomach through the mouth. It is usually preceded by nausea, increased salivation and retching.
Vomiting occurs as part of a normal reflex action and most commonly occurs when something irritates either the gut or brain or during pregnancy.
Often, during a fever or infection the stomach voids itself of foods as blood is diverted to areas other than the digestive system. Similarly, when contaminated or poisonous foods are eaten the body naturally vomits to empty the stomach of the food.

It can occur for many reasons including in response to an infection in the digestive tract, food poisoning, during pregnancy, when the stomach is overloaded, gallbladder disease, motion sickness, some medications, some cancers and brain tumours, concussion, overheating, excessive alcohol consumption, kidney conditions such as nephritis, ingestion of toxins or poisons, radiation exposure, emotional states such as fear or anxiety, worms and other parasitic infestations, self induced such as in bulimia, intense pain, intestinal blockages, gastritis, digestive ulcers, appendicitis, pancreatitis, over exertion, Menieres disease or other inner ear/balance disorders and migraine.
 
Prolonged or persistent vomiting can lead to dehydration and loss of vital salts (such as magnesium) and even erosion of tooth enamel.
However if the vomiting is as a result of ingesting contaminated foods (food poisoning) then it should be allowed to continue until the stomach is empty to aid the body's natural cleansing efforts. Make sure to keep well hydrated and if vomiting persists, try the remedies or see a doctor.
Blood or darker coloured material in the vomit may be a sign of bleeding from the stomach or oesophagus or of liver or gallbaldder disease. Bile can also be present.
 
Healing objectives are to identify the cause of vomiting and treat that where needed. Drink plenty of water and fluids in the form of herbal teas if possible, sometimes plain water can make you vomit more.

Diet and lifestyle

Diet and lifestyle

Make sure you keep drinking fluids regularly, if you even throw up plain water, add a few of the herbs mentioned. It is important to stay well hydrated.

 

Try the onion juice cure....grate a fresh onion and squeeze it to extract a tablespoon of onion juice. Add the juice to a cup of strong peppermint tea and sip slowly. It should start working almost immediately.

 

Don't try to eat anything like a meal or solid food if you are vomiting, instead have a teaspoon of honey in black tea for example.

Chewing small pieces of candied ginger or fresh ginger tea can help to relieve both nausea and vomiting.
Sucking and gently chewing on a clove can help to to relieve vomiting and nausea.
Strong black tea (use 2 teabags) sipped over several minutes can quickly stop vomiting, add a spoon of honey for even better effects.
Add a pinch of cinnamon to any herbal tea.
Some people find relief from sipping the syrup from a tinned peaches.

Useful herbs

Useful herbs

Sipping warm peppermint tea may help to reduce vomiting.
 
Black horehound and meadowsweet tea (equal parts) can help to relieve vomiting.
 
Herbs to relieve vomiting and nausea when due to liver or gallbladder conditions include gentian root,  barberry root, holy thistle and wild yam.
 
Antispasmodic and nervous system herbs can be used to calm the vomit reflex. These include wild yam, chamomile, fennel seeds catnip, ginger and peppermint.

Natural healing

Natural healing

Adding some pure honey to a little water or oral re-hydration salts (ORS) can help to relieve nausea and vomiting quicker than ORS alone.
Placing a cold wet compress over the throat/neck area can help to relieve nausea and vomiting.

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