art_plant_large   

Thrombosis

General characteristics

General characteristics

The term thrombosis describes the presence of a blood clot in the arteries or veins. A blood clot (or thrombus, plural thrombi) forms as a normal bodily response to an injured blood vessel and is composed of mainly red blood cells and the insoluble blood clotting component fibrin. A thrombus may also form when an injury is not present when the circumstances allow it. The thrombus may grow and form a blockage in the vessels preventing proper blood flow through the affected vessels. When a blood clot breaks free and travels in the circulating blood it is called an embolism.

 

A thrombus may form in response to an injury to the blood vessel walls, after surgeries, as a result of impaired blood flow, periods of inactivity (such as prolonged bed rest or long flights), in arteries that have plaque like deposits on their inner linings, heart beat irregularities that alter blood flow, inflammation in the blood vessels linings, valve disorders in the veins, oral contraceptive and hormone replacement therapy, high blood pressure, weak heart function, obesity and poor dietary choices, anything that causes the blood to be thick and sluggish (poor diet etc), autoimmune disorders, coming off blood thinning medications, rheumatism, physical injuries and fractures, cancer and some tumours and smoking.

 

The ultimate result of a thrombus is reduced (or in extreme cases complete stoppage of) blood flow to areas that the blood vessels are supplying and can lead to tissue death. A heart attack is also known as coronary thrombosis and a thrombus in the vessels of the brain can cause a stroke.


Diet and lifestyle

Diet and lifestyle

Adopt a diet based around fresh whole foods and avoid and limit processed foods, junk foods and foods high in refined carbohydrates. 

 

Vitamin D rich foods such as organic grass fed dairy products can help to prevent thrombosis.

 

Onions and garlic help both and remedy thrombosis.

 

Oily fish and other foods rich in omega oils and fats such as seeds and whole grains are thought to exhibit a preventative factor against thrombus formation and reduce inflammation.

 

The 'Mediterranean diet', rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, natural oils and the like is thought to reduce the likelihood of thrombus formation. 

 

Foods rich in vitamin E, such as whole grains, can help to provide protection against thrombosis.

 

Other foods implicated for thrombosis prevention include cayenne (chili powder)carrots, sesame seeds, nutmeg, tomatoes, seeded red grapes, peanuts, royal jelly, ginger, fennel seeds, cumin seeds, cloves, olives and olive oil, tarragon, marjoram and savory.

 

Adding turmeric to your food can help to reduce the likelihood of thrombosis and inflammation.

 

Including some fresh pineapple in the diet can also help to reduce the occurrence of thrombus formation.

 

Red grapes, either in the form of red wine ( consumed moderately), fresh as a fruit or red grape juice can also help reduce the formation of thrombi.

 

Dark chocolate (especially raw cocoa nibs which contain a wealth of useful nutrients) helps protect against thrombosis.


Useful herbs

Useful herbs

A useful daily tea to help prevent thrombosis, provide valuable nutrients and promote proper blood flow could include equal parts of nettle leaf, ginkgo leaf, hawthorn flowers and yarrow with a pinch of cayenne powder added. Increase the amount of cayenne gradually over the weeks to up to a teaspoon 3 times daily.

 

Myrrh exhibits good anti-thrombotic qualities.

 

Wintergreen essential oil is as effective as aspirin in thinning the blood and preventing blood clot formation. Use the oil sparingly and always diluted in a carrier oil.


Natural healing

Natural healing

Make sure you are getting regular moderate exercise to keep the heart and blood flowing well.


  • No comments found
Add comment

Mini Cart

 x 

Cart empty
Child watering plants

 

 

 

© the wild pharma 2013 | tel: +044 [0]1435 831 525 | email : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | Terms of using this website