art_plant_large Click to view images

Dysentery

General characteristics

General characteristics

Dysentery is commonly categorized as either 'amoebic' or 'bacillary'. Infection with dysentery causes the intestines to become inflamed with symptoms such as watery diarrhoea, abdominal pain, fever, blood or mucous in the faeces. Some of the most serious complications often arise from the effects of severe dehydration.

Amoebic dysentery is caused by the organism entamoeba hystolytica and is more common in tropical countries and in those who have been travelling in such countries. It is passed on through contact with contaminated food, water or through direct contact with the faeces of others infected with the organism. The amoebas can enter the body as free organisms (which rarely cause a problem and are killed in the stomach) or in groups enclosed in a protective cyst which is more serious as they survive the stomach acids and can proliferate.The organisms are capable of perforating the bowel wall and travelling via the blood to other sites such as the liver, lungs and even brain. The bowel may become ulcerated as a result of infection and liver abscesses may also form, leading to further complications. It is possible to have amoebic dysentery, symptom free, for up to several years but still be capable of passing on the infection through poor hygiene. Amoebic dysentery does not usually cause a fever.

Bacterial dysentery is more common in the UK, particularly in children and is caused by the shigella organism. It is picked up in the same ways as amoebic dysentery. Stool tests can be taken to determine which type of dysentery you have. Bacillary dysentery causes fever, copious watery stools with blood and mucous often present, tiredness, pain and abdominal cramps. Often the condition improves, untreated, within a week or so but care must be taken to avoid dehydration and to ensure adequate nutrition and rest are achieved.

If you are found to have any form of dysentery it is vital to ensure good hygiene so that the disease is not passed on to any others. Wash your hands thoroughly with hot soapy water after going to the toilet, do not prepare or handle food for others, avoid using public bathing spaces, do not share towels or other such items and wash bed clothes and other clothing in a very hot wash.

Herbs and natural treatments aim to soothe the symptoms such as pain and cramping, keep the person well nourished and hydrated and give herbs to help the body to deal with the infection. The diarrhoea as such is usually not suppressed as this is the body's way of trying to eliminate the infective organism.

Diet and lifestyle

Diet and lifestyle

It is wise to avoid solid food and opt instead for nutritious fresh fruit and vegetable juices, homemade watery soups and porridge like 'gruel' (using oats, rice and other powdered grains) while the infection is active.

Potassium broth will help to replace lost salts and electrolytes. Make this by gently simmering a handful each of cleaned fresh organic potato peelings, green leaves (such as celery tops, chard or spinach), carrot peel, beetroot, onions and a pinch of sea salt in a pan of water for about an hour. Strain off the liquid and drink throughout the day.

Drink plenty of fluids throughout the day to ensure proper hydration.


Useful herbs

Useful herbs

Blackberry root is an old trusted remedy for helping to speed up the resolution of dysentery and is a favourite of gypsies and many indigenous peoples. Put 2 teaspoons of dried blackberry root into a pan with 2 cupfuls of water and simmer for 20 minutes. Drink half a cup every hour or so throughout the day.
Herbs like cranesbill, raspberry leaf, yarrow andladys mantle can be used in their dried form to provide gentle astringency, slowing the flow of blood, mucous and diarrhoea.
Carminative herbs like chamomile, fennel, dill, peppermint, wild yam root and holy thistle will help to relieve painful spasms in the abdomen.
Anti-microbial herbs like echinacea, goldenseal and wild indigo will help to fight infection. Use in tincture form. Barberry root is an antimicrobial herb that is very useful at killing infection and slowing diarrhoea.
Soothing and mucilaginous herbs like marshmallow root, slippery elm and crushed fenugreek seeds will coat the intestines with a healing a protective coat, allowing healing to take place, provide enough bulk to slow down bowel transit time and help the body retain fluids.
A pinch of boneset dried herb can be added to any of the above mixes for its digestive tonic action.

Natural healing

Natural healing

Crush a large clove of garlic and add to some honey. Take twice daily to help kill the infection.
Cut 2 large organic lemons into slices and simmer in half a pint of water for a few minutes. Drink the liquid in 3 doses over the day.
Daily enemas may be useful to help flush out the infection and soothe the intestinal walls. Use a tea of boneset, chamomile and ladys mantle.

  • No comments found
Add comment

Mini Cart

 x 

Cart empty
Child watering plants

 

 

 

© the wild pharma 2013 | tel: +044 [0]1435 831 525 | email : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | Terms of using this website